Hair Loss And Stem Cells

Hair Loss Issues: Dermal Stem Cells and Epidermal Cells

Hair Loss Issues: Dermal Stem Cells and Epidermal Cells

When suffering from hair loss, the telogen phase is prolonged, and the transition to the anagen phase becomes more difficult. Hair become thinner and the percentage of hair transitioning to the telogen phase continues to increase.

The problem comes from the fact that the hair follicle stem cells (also called ORSc) located in the bulge along the hair, are less productive, and less adapted to improve the quality of the matrix (made of keratinocytes) supporting the hair follicle growth. Furthermore, the fibroblasts located in the dermal papilla (also called HFDPc) are less efficient in communicating with the stem cells, meaning that the matrix will not be renewed as it used to.

Initiating the anagen phase becomes more sluggish, and hair loss becomes a part of daily life.

Hair loss occurs

When the telogen phase is prolonged and the transition to the anagen phase becomes more difficult, extended hair loss occurs.

Hair becomes thinner. The percentage of hair transitioning to the telogen phase increases.

This happens when hair follicle stem cells, also called ORSc, become less productive, less adaptive to improving the quality of the matrix that supports follicle growth. This matrix is made of keratinocytes. Furthermore, the fibroblasts located in the dermal papilla, called HFDPc, are less efficient in communicating with the stem cells, resulting in the matrix no longer renewing as it used to.

Thus initiating the anagen phase becomes more sluggish, and hair loss becomes an eventual part of daily life.

Hair loss is caused by a number of factors

Hair loss is caused by a number of factors, including

  • Aging
  • Medication (e.g. contraceptive pills, steroid, etc)
  • Postpartum period
  • Hormonal imbalance e.g. thyroid
  • Menopause
  • Under pressure and stressful lifestyle
  • Chemical hair product, over perms or dye

Hair Loss: By The Numbers